Samoan Symbols And Meanings
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Samoan Symbols And Meanings

PORTIONS

2009 U.S.MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

24

Grades kindergarten and One Students will identify, understand, and create simple patterns.1 overhead projector (optional)1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the following:“United States and Territories Map” from the Resource Guide–“American Samoan Symbols” worksheet–“Classroom Symbols” worksheet–Copies of the following:“United States and Territories Map” from the Resource Guide–“American Samoan Symbols” worksheet1 copy of a text (or some pictures) that gives information about American Samoa, such as:Paci c Islands– by Katherine Kristen and Kathleen ThompsonTerritories and Possessions– by Thomas G.and Virginia L.

Aylesworth Puerto Rico and Other Outlying Areas– by Michael BurganPattern (Math Counts)– by Henry Arthur Pluckrose– by Trudy Harris– by Sara PistoiaChart paperMarkersConstruction paper (8 X 11)ScissorsGluePencilsCrayons4: Patterning in the PacificBased on the American Samoa quarter reverse"American Samoa Quarter" page– PORTIONS

2009 U.S.

MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

25

Grades kindergarten and One PREPARATIONSMake an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:“American Samoa Quarter” page“United States and Territories Map” from the Resource Guide“United States and T–(optional)“American Samoan Symbols” worksheet (1 per student)–“Classroom Symbols” worksheet (1 per student)–Locate a text or pictures that gives information about American Samoa (see exam-ples under “Materials”).Locate a text that gives information about patterns (see examples under “Materi-als”).Cut out the boxes of symbols on the “American Samoan Symbols” overhead trans-parency prior to Session 2.Create first three examples of classroom symbols from class-generated list (Session 1) to model and use in Session 3.GROUPINGSWhole groupIndividual workCLASS TIMEThree 20- to 30-minute ArtsSocial StudiesPatterning in the Pacific PORTIONS

2009 U.S.

MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

26

Grades kindergarten and One TERMS AND CONCEPTSQuarter Obverse (front) Reverse (back)Symbol Territory IslandAtoll

Pattern Volcano

Reef BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGEStudents should have a basic knowledge of maps.STEPSSession 1Discuss the term “symbol” with the students.

Define a symbol as a printed or writ-1.ten sign or picture that reminds people of something else.

Write the denition on chart paper.

Discuss some symbols the students are already familiar with within the classroom as well as what those symbols represent (for example, the American

sign indicates a bathroom).

Record student responses on chart paper.Ask the students to think of some symbols of the United States of America.

En-2., eagle, and Statue of Liberty.3.ve territories.

When deDepartment of the Interior’s

found at a

to the chart paper.Display the “United States and Territories Map” and the “American Samoa Map”

overhead transparencies.

Note the territories’ positions in relation to your school’s location and color them yellow.Describe the District of Columbia and United States Territories Quarters5.for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state’s or territory’s quarter.

Then display the transparency or photocopy of the “American quarter.

Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the reverse, and “obverse” is another name for the front.

Locate American Samoa on the overhead transpar-ency and the classroom map.

Note its position in relation to your school’s location.Tell the students that American Samoa is made up of 6.coral atolls.

On chart paper, create a diagram of American Samoa, including the Patterning in the Pacific PORTIONS

2009 U.S.MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

27

Grades kindergarten and One by water.

Add the dene an atoll as a coral island and reef that surrounds a lagoon.

Add the deIntroduce the students to the selected text or pictures on American Samoa.

Pre-7.Read the selected text.

During the reading, attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.

After the reading, review the image on the coin.

Ask the students why they think 9.the images may have been chosen for the coin.10.people of American Samoa.

Explain that the palm tree and coastline represent the islands of American Samoa.

The ava bowl (also called a tanoa) is used to make the special ceremonial drink for the chiefs and guests during important events.

The whisk and staff represent the rank of the Samoan orator, or speaker, and are used 11Review and collect the students’ worksheets.Session 2

Review the “American Samoa Quarter” page and information from Session 1.1.

Introduce the students to the selected text on patterns.

Preview the text and illustra-2.Read the text.

During the reading, attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.

After the reading, discuss patterns.

As an example, give the sequence red, yellow, 4.red, yellow, red, yellow, and ask which color would come next.

Then ask about patterns the students may know.

Record their responses on chart paper.

Then label

previous session.

Review the symbols on the coin.6.symbols from the coin.

Remind the students that, in order for a group to be consid-ered a pattern, its unique parts need to repeat at least two times.Display the previously cut out parts of the “American Samoan Symbols” overhead 7.

transparency.

8.Patterning in the Pacific PORTIONS

2009 U.S.MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

28

Grades kindergarten and One bel them ABABAB.

Then demonstrate and practice a variety of patterns (such as ABAB, ABBABB, AABAAB, or AABBAABB).9.paper to each student.

Tell the students that now they are going to practice some Allow the students enough time to complete this activity.10.After the students are done, allow them to glue one of their patterns onto the paper.11 Sessions 3
Review the previous sessions and discussions on symbols and patterns.

Review the 1.classroom symbols chart from Session 1.2.those symbols.

Remind them that a pattern needs to repeat itself at least two times.3.Allow an appropriate amount of time for the students to complete this activity.As a class, review the patterns and display them appropriately.

Take anecdotal notes about the students’ participation in class discussions.Evaluate the students’ worksheets for understanding of the lesson objectives.Have students color their patterns maintaining the AB pattern with their coloring.Have students use the American Samoan symbols to create more complex patterns.Have students research other territories of the United States.

Have them create symbols for each of these territories as well.DIFFERENTIATED LEARNING OPTIONSAllow students to work in pairs.Provide students with a copy of the “Classroom Symbols” worksheet with the first two symbols already chosen for them.Patterning in the Pacific PORTIONS

2009 U.S.

MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

29

Grades kindergarten and One CONNECTION TO WWW.USMINT.GOV/KIDSHave students learn more about symbols with the Oklahoma quarter lesson plan at students learn more about the Unites States Territories by using the 2009 quar-ter lesson plans at in the Pacific PORTIONS

2009 U.S.MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

30

Grades kindergarten and One American Samoa MapSwain’s IslandRose Atoll (Rose Pacific Ocean PORTIONS

2009 U.S.

MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

31

Grades kindergarten and One

Cut out the symbols and use them to create an

Name ____________________________
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2804480
PORTIONS

2009 U.S.MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

24

Grades kindergarten and One Students will identify, understand, and create simple patterns.1 overhead projector (optional)1 overhead transparency (or photocopy) of the following:“United States and Territories Map” from the Resource Guide–“American Samoan Symbols” worksheet–“Classroom Symbols” worksheet–Copies of the following:“United States and Territories Map” from the Resource Guide–“American Samoan Symbols” worksheet1 copy of a text (or some pictures) that gives information about American Samoa, such as:Paci c Islands– by Katherine Kristen and Kathleen ThompsonTerritories and Possessions– by Thomas G.and Virginia L.

Aylesworth Puerto Rico and Other Outlying Areas– by Michael BurganPattern (Math Counts)– by Henry Arthur Pluckrose– by Trudy Harris– by Sara PistoiaChart paperMarkersConstruction paper (8 X 11)ScissorsGluePencilsCrayons4: Patterning in the PacificBased on the American Samoa quarter reverse"American Samoa Quarter" page– PORTIONS

2009 U.S.

MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

25

Grades kindergarten and One PREPARATIONSMake an overhead transparency (or photocopy) of each of the following:“American Samoa Quarter” page“United States and Territories Map” from the Resource Guide“United States and T–(optional)“American Samoan Symbols” worksheet (1 per student)–“Classroom Symbols” worksheet (1 per student)–Locate a text or pictures that gives information about American Samoa (see exam-ples under “Materials”).Locate a text that gives information about patterns (see examples under “Materi-als”).Cut out the boxes of symbols on the “American Samoan Symbols” overhead trans-parency prior to Session 2.Create first three examples of classroom symbols from class-generated list (Session 1) to model and use in Session 3.GROUPINGSWhole groupIndividual workCLASS TIMEThree 20- to 30-minute ArtsSocial StudiesPatterning in the Pacific PORTIONS

2009 U.S.MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

26

Grades kindergarten and One TERMS AND CONCEPTSQuarter Obverse (front) Reverse (back)Symbol Territory IslandAtoll

Pattern Volcano

Reef BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGEStudents should have a basic knowledge of maps.STEPSSession 1Discuss the term “symbol” with the students.

Define a symbol as a printed or writ-1.ten sign or picture that reminds people of something else.

Write the denition on chart paper.

Discuss some symbols the students are already familiar with within the classroom as well as what those symbols represent (for example, the American

sign indicates a bathroom).

Record student responses on chart paper.Ask the students to think of some symbols of the United States of America.

En-2., eagle, and Statue of Liberty.3.ve territories.

When deDepartment of the Interior’s

found at a

to the chart paper.Display the “United States and Territories Map” and the “American Samoa Map”

overhead transparencies.

Note the territories’ positions in relation to your school’s location and color them yellow.Describe the District of Columbia and United States Territories Quarters5.for background information, if necessary, using the example of your own state’s or territory’s quarter.

Then display the transparency or photocopy of the “American quarter.

Tell the students that the back of a coin is called the reverse, and “obverse” is another name for the front.

Locate American Samoa on the overhead transpar-ency and the classroom map.

Note its position in relation to your school’s location.Tell the students that American Samoa is made up of 6.coral atolls.

On chart paper, create a diagram of American Samoa, including the Patterning in the Pacific PORTIONS

2009 U.S.

MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

27

Grades kindergarten and One by water.

Add the dene an atoll as a coral island and reef that surrounds a lagoon.

Add the deIntroduce the students to the selected text or pictures on American Samoa.

Pre-7.Read the selected text.

During the reading, attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.

After the reading, review the image on the coin.

Ask the students why they think 9.the images may have been chosen for the coin.

10.people of American Samoa.

Explain that the palm tree and coastline represent the islands of American Samoa.

The ava bowl (also called a tanoa) is used to make the special ceremonial drink for the chiefs and guests during important events.

The whisk and staff represent the rank of the Samoan orator, or speaker, and are used 11Review and collect the students’ worksheets.Session 2

Review the “American Samoa Quarter” page and information from Session 1.1.

Introduce the students to the selected text on patterns.

Preview the text and illustra-2.Read the text.

During the reading, attend to any unfamiliar vocabulary.After the reading, discuss patterns.

As an example, give the sequence red, yellow, 4.red, yellow, red, yellow, and ask which color would come next.

Then ask about patterns the students may know.

Record their responses on chart paper.

Then label

previous session.

Review the symbols on the coin.6.symbols from the coin.

Remind the students that, in order for a group to be consid-ered a pattern, its unique parts need to repeat at least two times.Display the previously cut out parts of the “American Samoan Symbols” overhead 7.transparency.

8.Patterning in the Pacific PORTIONS

2009 U.S.

MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

28

Grades kindergarten and One bel them ABABAB.

Then demonstrate and practice a variety of patterns (such as ABAB, ABBABB, AABAAB, or AABBAABB).9.paper to each student.

Tell the students that now they are going to practice some Allow the students enough time to complete this activity.10.After the students are done, allow them to glue one of their patterns onto the paper.

11 Sessions 3
Review the previous sessions and discussions on symbols and patterns.

Review the 1.classroom symbols chart from Session 1.2.those symbols.

Remind them that a pattern needs to repeat itself at least two times.3.Allow an appropriate amount of time for the students to complete this activity.As a class, review the patterns and display them appropriately.Take anecdotal notes about the students’ participation in class discussions.Evaluate the students’ worksheets for understanding of the lesson objectives.Have students color their patterns maintaining the AB pattern with their coloring.Have students use the American Samoan symbols to create more complex patterns.Have students research other territories of the United States.

Have them create symbols for each of these territories as well.DIFFERENTIATED LEARNING OPTIONSAllow students to work in pairs.Provide students with a copy of the “Classroom Symbols” worksheet with the first two symbols already chosen for them.Patterning in the Pacific PORTIONS

2009 U.S.MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

29

Grades kindergarten and One CONNECTION TO WWW.USMINT.GOV/KIDSHave students learn more about symbols with the Oklahoma quarter lesson plan at students learn more about the Unites States Territories by using the 2009 quar-ter lesson plans at in the Pacific PORTIONS

2009 U.S.MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

30

Grades kindergarten and One American Samoa MapSwain’s IslandRose Atoll (Rose Pacific Ocean PORTIONS

2009 U.S.MINT.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

31

Grades kindergarten and One

Cut out the symbols and use them to create an

Name ____________________________.

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